Monthly Archives: March 2011

Visit ESF Summer Session’s Webpage

Error
This video doesn’t exist

www.esf.edu/outreach/summer

Summer Biomass Internship Program

I recently let you know about a new USDA, National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Higher Education Challenge grant we , along with our partner organizations, CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity and the Syracuse Center of Excellence, have received (From Farm and Forest to Fuel: An Integrative and Experiential Approach to Bioenergy, Biofuels and Bioproducts Education, February 25, 2011).

Error
This video doesn’t exist

I’m pleased to let you know that our project director, Dr. Tim Volk, has recently announced the related launch of the Summer Biomass Internship Program for students enrolled part time or full time in a SUNY-ESF or Syracuse University undergraduate or graduate degree program.  Complete information about internship opportunities and application procedures is available at:                      www.esf.edu/outreach/projects/fff.htm

Students interested in one of the internships posted (or representatives from additional internship program host organizations) may contact

Central New York is poised to become a focal point for the development of biomass systems for the production of heat, power, fuels and products. The shortage of well trained professionals to meet the growing demand of the bioenergy field is one of the barriers to the development of biomass as a source of renewable energy. There is a continuing need for a well-educated and skilled workforce with the background and experience to address the complexities of this rapidly developing industry. This internship program is an important part of our efforts to prepare knowledgeable and experienced professionals with the requisite analytical, creative thinking and problem solving skills to meet the growing demand of the bioenergy field in the region.

The summer biomass internship program provides opportunities for qualified college students to work with a Central New York company that is focused on biomass issues. Participating students will gain experience in the biomass field while concurrently meeting workplace and industry needs to increase the quality of postsecondary instruction in bioenergy. This program will help to build on valuable relationships between local firms working in the biomass field and college students studying in the region.

Please help us to share this information with students and others at Syracuse University and SUNY ESF.  Thank you.

Chuck Spuches, Associate Provost for Outreach

ESF Summer Session 2011

I am enthused to report that our faculty have assembled a wonderful array of courses and programs that will serve ESF students, as well as visiting college/university students, rising high school seniors, K-12 educators, professionals and lifelong learners through a more formal four-part Summer Session.

ESF’s four summer terms include online, classroom, and field-based courses:

  • Maymester (2 weeks): Monday, May 16 – Friday, May 27
  • Summer Session 1 (6 weeks): Monday, May 23 – Friday, July 1
  • Summer Session 2 (6 weeks): Tuesday, July 05 – Friday, August 12
  • Combined Session (12 weeks): Monday, May 23 – Friday, August 12

In addition to serving students enrolled in ESF undergraduate and graduate degree programs (referred to as matriculated students), ESF welcomes in good standing at other colleges or universities (we call these Visiting Students and you will also hear “nonmatriculated” or “nondegree” classifications used to describe students who are not enrolled in degree programs at our campus).  Students will find this a convenient and effective way to make up a course or to advance their academic progress.

Summer Session 2011 represents many of ESF’s academic areas and includes applied mathematics, information literacy and writing skills, as well as courses that will serve academic professional development needs and interests.

Course schedules and descriptions, registration, tuition, financial aid, and related information are available at the ESF Summer Session 2011 web page: www.esf.edu/outreach/summer

For your information and convenience, I’ve included below a list of courses arranged by topical area.

Chuck Spuches, Associate Provost for Outreach

ESF Summer 2011 Courses by Format and Topical Area

ESF Online

  • Writing , Humanities and the Environment (CLL 290; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Humanities and Critical Thinking; required for all ESF undergraduate majors)
  • Pre-calculus and College Algebra (APM 104; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Mathematics)
  • Information Literacy (ESF 200; 1 credit hour) (required for ESF majors in Forestry, Chemistry, Paper and Bioprocess Engineering, and Landscape Architecture)
  • Climate Change Science and Sustainability (ESC 296; 1 credit hour)

Applied Mathematics

  • Pre-calculus and College Algebra – Online  (APM 104; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Mathematics)
  • Survey of Calculus and its Applications I (APM 105;  4 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Mathematics)
  • Survey of Calculus and its Applications II (APM 106; 4 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Mathematics)
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics (APM 391; 3 credit hours)

Information Literacy and Writing Skills

  • Information Literacy (ESF 200; 1 credit hour) (two sections: online and classroom; required for ESF majors in Forestry, Chemistry, Paper and Bioprocess Engineering, and Landscape Architecture)
  • Writing, Humanities and the Environment (CLL 290; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirements for Humanities and Critical Thinking; required for all ESF undergraduate majors)

Environmental and Forest Biology

  • Genetics/Genetics Lab (EFB 307 – class; 3 credit hours. EFB 308 – lab; 1 credit hour)
  • Flora of Central New York (EFB 496/796; 3 credit hours)
  • Plant Physiology (EFB 530; 3 credit hours)
  • University Outreach: Advanced Training Workshop in Alternative Energy (EFB 796/FCH 796; 2 credit hours)

Landscape Architecture

  • Basic Computing (LSA 200/696; 1 credit hour) (required for all ESF undergraduate and graduate majors in Landscape Architecture)
  • Computer Aided Design (LSA 303/503; 3 credit hours) (two sessions! Please note: required for all ESF undergraduate and graduate majors in Landscape Architecture)
  • Community Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (LSA 496/696; 3 credit hours)
  • Introduction to Brownfields (LSA 496/696; 2 credit hours)
  • Living Willow Structures (LSA 496/696; 3 credit hours)
  • Introduction to Golf Course Architecture (LSA 496/696; 3 credit hours)

Environmental Studies

  • Writing, Humanities and the Environment (CLL 290; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirements for Humanities and Critical Thinking; required for all ESF undergraduate majors)
  • Introduction to Native Peoples, Lands and Cultures (EST 140; 3 credit hours) (fulfills SUNY General Education requirements for Other World Civilizations)
  • Food, Culture and the Environment from Garden to Table (EST 296; 3 credit hours)
  • Introduction to Human Geography (EST 296; 3 credit hours)
  • Human Impacts on the Environment (EST 296; 3 credit hours)
  • Environmental Social Marketing (EST 496/696; 3 credit hours)
  • Environmental Impact Analysis (EST 550; 3 credit hours)

Environmental Science

  • Climate Change Science and Sustainability – online class (ESC 296; 1 credit hour)

Forest and Natural Resources Management

  • Introduction to Geospatial Information Technologies (ESF 300; 3 credit hours)
  • Introduction to Green Entrepreneurship (FOR 296; 3 credit hours)

Paper and Bioprocess Engineering

  • Introduction to Industrial Bioprocessing (BPE 300/596; 3 credit hours) (required for ESF undergraduate major in bioprocess engineering)
  • Summer Internship in Bioprocess Engineering (BPE 304; 2 credit hours) (required for ESF undergraduate major in bioprocess engineering)
  • Bioprocess Plant Design (ERE 503; 3 credit hours) (required for BPE certificate –  bioprocess option)
  • Biomass Resources and Emerging Bioenergy industries (ERE 796; 3 credit hours) (required for BPE certificate – bioenergy option)
  • Mill Experience (PSE 304; 2 credit hours) (required for ESF undergraduate major in Paper Science and Paper Engineering)

Courses for K-12 Teachers or Rising High School Seniors

  • Introduction to Green Entrepreneurship for rising high school seniors (FOR 296; 3 credit hours)
  • Advanced Training Workshop in Alternative Energy for K-12 teachers (EFB 796/FCH 796; 2 credit hours)

Course schedules and descriptions, registration, tuition, financial aid, and related information are available at the ESF Summer Session 2011 web page: www.esf.edu/outreach/summer

Syracuse City Schools Take ESF’s Environmental Challenge

Science fair draws students from 11 city schools

When the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) held its first Environmental Challenge science fair in 2001 there were 35 participants. Ten years later, the event brought together more than 600 students presenting 300-plus science projects.

The students, from 11 schools in the Syracuse City School District (SCSD), presented projects ranging from liquid density to chemical reactions to the cultivation of molds and fungi. Because of the number of participants, the event was held on the field of the Carrier Dome.

“It’s an exciting venue for the students to show off their work and it’s a great way to encourage the kids to think in scientific ways,” said Brandon Murphy, project coordinator with ESF Outreach.

For her project, Allison Barrett, a seventh grader at Edward Smith School, questioned the influence moisture plays on popcorn. Her display featured a sample of popcorn that had been presoaked before popping, another that had been baked in an oven prior to popping and a control group of unaltered popcorn. She found the control group popped best.

“I like that science can be fun and you can learn from it,” she said. Of her project, she said “I wanted to do something fun. I like popping corn, but not eating it.”

Students from Grant Middle School were looking for solutions to oil spills. “We wanted to help oil companies find a way to make oil less dense so it would float on the water and be easier to clean up,” said Jennifer Locke.

Rodney Robinson, an eighth-grader at Roberts K-8 School, studied the effect temperature has on the reactioni between baking soda and vinegar. “I always get better grades and learn more about science when doing experiments.” Robinson figures this approach to learning will help him in his future career endeavors to be a crime scene investigator.

The Environmental Challenge is designed to encourage student projects that support and extend the seventh/eighth-grade grade science curriculum; foster student and teacher research, scientific inquiry, and critical thinking; expand student exploration of science, engineering, and related careers and educational interests; and increase student exploration and understanding of the urban environment and its relationship to the global environment.

Story by ESF’s Office of Communications.